Archive by Author

Stuart Ross reports in on Mansfield’s fall list

It’s been a mad spring and early summer. While launching my own new book, the story collection Buying Cigarettes for the Dog (Freehand Books), in Vancouver, the Kootenays, Calgary, Toronto, Kingston, Ottawa, Montreal, Red Deer, and Edmonton, I’ve been working, mostly remotely, with fall Mansfield authors Robert Earl Stewart, Jim Smith, and Tom Walmsley. After […]

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Catherine Owen: On “siting” oneself and other fabulations

I’ve had my own website since 2003. Initially, it was a compendium of “everything I’ve done,” an exhaustingly unreadable mishmash of muses and manuscripts, photographs and pursuits. I even tried to upload each review I’d written, every essay, and provide a sample poem from each of my books. In 2009, while I’m still a technophobe […]

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Pigeon

Review by Andrew Faulkner Pigeon Karen Solie House of Anansi Press, 2009 112 pages, $18.95 We know who Karen Solie is. She is the author of Short Haul Engine and Modern and Normal, which have brought her a fistful of awards and nominations. Solie was the Canadian judge for the 2007 Griffin Poetry Prize, and […]

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Fond

Reviewed by Aaron Tucker Fond Kate Eichhorn BookThug, 2008 80 pages, $20 The modern mind is no longer asked to remember. As Google swallows information, repackages and archives it, the need for memory shrinks; it becomes far more important to know where and how to find a fact than to retain that same fact. Therefore […]

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Steve Venright reflects on somniloquies

Dion McGregor is one of the few human beings — can you think of another? — ever to achieve renown for a body of work created while fast asleep. For several years beginning in the early 1960s, McGregor’s New York roommate Michael Barr would rise early almost every morning to capture on tape what are […]

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Jim Smith searches for the Spanish Civil War

I’ve had the good luck to visit Spain three times in the last two years — Barcelona, Madrid, Granada, Frigiliana, Malaga and, most recently, León and Galicia in the northwest. Each time I went looking for traces of the Spanish Civil War. I came back with mere traces. In Barcelona, the city had a small […]

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Jason Heroux sends a Hoboken Postcard

Friday, May 29, 2009: I’m in Hoboken, New Jersey, with my father, staying in one of the vacant dormitories at the Stevens Institute of Technology. My father spent a memorable portion of his childhood growing up in this area, and a part of him one day wants his ashes buried near Helmer’s Restaurant, where they […]

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Crabwise, Crabwise, Burning Bright

Reviewed by Jeff Latosik Crabwise to the Hounds Jeramy Dodds Coach House Books, 2008 80 pages, $16.95 Wallace Stevens famously quipped, “A poem need not have a meaning and like most things in nature often does not have.” While such a sentiment may do little to win over those who desire a clear raison d’être […]

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Robert Earl Stewart’s “Near Muted Swans”

Near Muted Swans A likeness like an electrocardiogram fire bleeding a blood orange running into what can only be called corpse paint grey, then rust wet waterline. I’m playing this game with the top of the food chain in the boats docked along the canal, with a long way to go through a Confederate town […]

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Jason Heroux praises parking lots

A little while ago a friend asked why I had so much parking-lot imagery in my poetry. I wasn’t sure how to answer. I gave it some thought and realized there’s something about parking lots I’ve always found beautiful and mysterious, especially late at night when they’re empty. — Collapse They have a peaceful, Zen-like […]

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