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Priscila Uppal’s Olympic Combo pack

Have you ever wondered what a luge poem or snowboarding poem or hockey poem would look like? In Winter Sport, Priscila Uppal, who was the poet-in-residence for Canadian Athletes Now during the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games, gave us a fun-filled look at the sporting world’s greatest show on earth. In Summer Sport, she did […]

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Our Days In Vaudeville

Stuart Ross and 29 Collaborators ISBN 978-1-77126-024-4 $17.00 CDN/USA 112 pages In this book—the first of its kind by a Canadian poet—Stuart Ross takes the stage in the vaudeville act that is collaborative poetry, with writers from across the country. Collaboration allows Ross to be part of poems—and the kinds of poems—he would never write […]

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Complete Surprising Fragments of Improbable Books

Stephen Brockwell ISBN 978-1-77126-012-1 $17.00 CDN/USA 104 pages Ottawa poet Stephen Brockwell has stumbled upon a vault of startling—and non-existent—volumes of outrageous poetry. This compendium of verse, Brockwell’s fifth full-length collection, draws from this imaginary motherlode, showcasing the poet at his most incisive, most harrowing, most political, and funniest. Here you’ll find unhinged narrative poems […]

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What The World Said

Jason Camlot ISBN 978-1-77126-016-9 $17.00 CDN/USA 112 pages Jason Camlot’s fourth full poetry collection, a Kaddish for the post-google age, explores the meaning of ignorance in the face of death—ignorance of how to practice sadness and rituals of mourning, and of how properly to experience longing and loss. Camlot manipulates a wide range of forms […]

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Monkey Soap

Glen Downie ISBN 978-1-77126-028-2 $17.00 CDN/USA 80 pages A sculptor, someone said, carves an elephant from a block of stone by chipping away everything that doesn’t look like an elephant. So in Monkey Soap, Glen Downie wields a poet’s incisive chisel to reveal poems hidden in other people’s prose. Not only a sculptor of language, […]

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Dear Leaves, I Miss You All

Sara Heinonen ISBN 978-1-77126-020-6 $20.00 CDN/US184 pp A workaholic sees the natural world with new eyes when her former colleague succumbs to a botanical affliction. Three teenagers try to sort out their friendships and their looming adulthood while their parents behave like teenagers. A Chinese immigrant struggles to accept his daughter’s developing sexuality as he […]

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Teeth: Poems 2006-2011

George Bowering     ISBN 978-1-771260-00-8 Every new collection by George Bowering is an event in Canadian poetry. His latest book—topping a six-decade writing career—is an eclectic, lively mix of free verse, list poems, haiku, and more. Whether Bowering is taking on the big themes—love, mortality, politics—or the mundane or trivial, his poems are fresh, […]

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Water Damage

Peter Norman ISBN 978-1-771260-08-4 $17.00 CDN / US 78 pp Following on the heels of his critically acclaimed poetry debut, Peter Norman’s second full collection is as funny and chilling as it is well-crafted. Here, the reader will find mad sonnets, outrageous prose poems, anagrammatic acrobatics, dark tributes, found poems, and many other experiments in […]

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Mother Died Last Summer

Mother Died Last Summer

David W. McFadden Journal of a month-long motor tour through Great Britain (with a side trip to France) with my father in June of 1992 ISBN 978-1-771260-04-6 $17.00 CDN / US 94 pp In 1992, a year after his mother died, poet David W. McFadden took his 78-year-old father, Bill, on a road trip through […]

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Summer Sport: Poems

Priscila Uppal ISBN 978-1-894469-94-4 $16.95 CDN/US 124 pp Here is the follow-up collection to Priscila Uppal’s Winter Sport: Poems. Uppal, who was the poet-in-residence for Canadian Athletes Now during the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games, is currently in London writing about the Summer Olympics with the characteristic wit and whimsy that made Winter Sport: Poems […]

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